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Children’s Team-Building Activities

March 21, 2016 / no comments, on PARENTING BLOGS

Children’s Team-Building Activities

Children’s Team-Building Activities are fun, constructive ways to help children to understand each other, build trust, and learn to work together. All the team members need to contribute towards his or her team’s success. Kids need to work together as a team to accomplish a common goal through their communication and cooperation skills. These positive interactions help to boost their self-esteem and communication skills. Children will learn that expressing their ideas while listening to others is the key to solving a problem.
 

Children's Team-Building Activities

Children’s Team-Building Activities

Best Children’s Team-Building Activities – As Suggested by the Experts

 
Since the launch of MomoandMe in January, I wanted to write about the team building activities for children. As a newbie blogger, I’ve been amazed by all the top ten’s lists and was nowhere close to choosing the best ones. That’s the reason we asked the experts to reveal the most effective children’s team-building activities. Read on to discover each expert’s favorite children’s team-building activities along with their awesome benefits!
 
Patti Wood is a BA and MA certified professional in Body Language and Nonverbal Communication. Her programs include body language, presentation skills, sales, and media interviewing. “Patti Wood is the Babe Ruth of body language experts, the gold standard of body language experts, and the capo di tutti capi of body language experts.” – The Washington Post. As per Patti, research indicated that children who show their emotions clearly and can decode the emotions from others peoples facial expression are the most popular and tend to have higher grades.
 
Facial Recognition Team Building ExerciseHave the children sit in a circle and take turns having the rest of the group guess what their facial expression means. Another way to use facial expression cards or photos. Arrange these facial expression cards online and put them up and have the children work on guessing the right feeling in small groups and then go through the facial expressions of the whole group to check who got the correct answers while the teacher breakdowns the features that create each emotion.
 
You can connect with her on Youtube, Blogspot,and her Website.


Randy McCoy is the Director of Curriculum in The Little Gym International. Randy has 30+ years of experience teaching child development classes and training The Little Gym teachers at the 300+ locations throughout the world. Team-building activities are a great way to promote and build relationships within a group, learn how to problem-solve with others, better appreciate the qualities and strengths of teammates, and builds group management skills. For children, they encourage thinking outside of their little world of ME, as they begin to understand the fun and value that working together has to offer.
 
See below for his best children’s team-building activities and why they are necessary for a child’s development. Each of them teaches kids how to share, take turns, and handle success or failure. These skills and abilities are essential in everyday life, school, and organized sports and help to develop executive function skills or cognitive abilities that allow a child to use multiple pieces of information to solve problems, multitask, and make decisions. Executive function skills are some of the most important determining factors in a child’s ability and success in learning.
 

Children's Team-Building Activities

Children’s Team-Building Activities


Team WeaverNeed one ball, Let the Kids stand in one big circle. One tyke carries the ball and runs/weaves in and out around the kids; handball to the next child! Repeat until everyone gets a turn!
 
Popcorn (ages 3-6)Need one parachute, 20-30 wadded paper balls, and The Parachute is the pan, and the paper balls are the popcorn. With the kids evenly spaced around the chute and holding the edge, dumps paper balls into the chute. Have children shake the chute wildly to make the popcorn pop! The goal is to keep stirring until all the popcorn got popped out of the pan! Intersperse shaking with a super pop: stop shaking the chute, and have everyone lift the chute up slowly. When the parachute gets to the highest point, the instructor yells POP – at which point everyone pulls the chute down fast and hard! It will result in the chute blasting all the paper balls rapidly into the air at once! When all the popcorn is popped out. Everyone can work together to pick up the popcorn and toss it back onto the chute to try it again! For fun, tell the kids to pretend to pour butter/oil in the pan before dumping the popcorn into it.
 
Circle Throw/CatchNeed one ball; Kids stand in a circle close together. Hand the ball one time around the circle. Time with a stopwatch – then do it again and see if the group can beat their time. Make circle bigger each round for more of a challenge. For a group of 10, have two smaller circles of 5 kids – and see which circle can do the fastest. Remember: It’s okay to lose!
James Carruthers is the managing director at Fradley Croft Events who specialize in providing team building activities and evening entertainment to users of all shapes, sizes (and ages). This kind of activities work well with kids as they are foremost good fun, but they stimulate group discussion, planning and relationship building – the cornerstones of good teams!
 
Spaghetti TowersRequirements: 100g dried spaghetti, 30x Jelly baby sweets, and One extra fluffy marshmallow. The Spaghetti and Marshmallow Tower activity are a tried and tested team building exercise for children. The aim is to use spaghetti to make a tower built to withstand the weight of a marshmallow! The jelly baby sweets which are utilized to hold the spaghetti in place have been known to slip, meaning the spaghetti to fall out of place, sometimes taking the whole tower with it. Patience is a virtue! It’s also a great lesson in damage control. The tallest tower which tolerates the marshmallow wins. Children’s ‘top down’ approach whereby they often start with the marshmallow and build down, means that they see results early on – this gives them the motivation to continue with the exercise and increases their competitiveness; they’re determined not to fall at the second hurdle. This activity is inimitable in its ability to demonstrate the importance of teamwork. While some team members might possess outstanding problem-solving skills or confidence in directing or interpreting instructions, others may have superior manual dexterity – crucial to accomplishing the final result.
 
You can connect with James Carruthers on Twitter, Facebook, and Google +.
Elizabeth Wright is a schools speaker, Paralympic Medalist, author, and co-founder of schools programme Resilience Wellbeing Success. The session she runs in RWS is the Success session where she does teamwork activities with the pupils to encourage communication, support, and collective problem-solving skills. Her suggested children’s team-building activities are listed below.
 
Hula Hoop HulaThe pupils stand in a circle holding hands, a hula hoop is placed over to joined hands, the pupils then have to use their communication skills and physical support of each other to get the hula hoop around the circle as fast as they can without breaking hands. This exercise emphasizes their communication and support skills; they learn how to work together to complete an activity, as well as the benefit of helping each other, motivating those in the circle to keep on going and do the best that they can.
Fly me to the moonThe children are divided into equal groups, one child is elected as the group Astronaut Captain, and has to lead the group in the activity. Each group is given a piece of paper and pen, and the instructions to act as a group of astronauts, about to board your rocket to head to the moon, but you realize that your supplies are missing. You have two minutes to list ten crucial things you need to gather together so that you can survive your trip to the moon. The pupils are then given two minutes to come up with ten (or more) items they all agree they will need to survive the trip. This activity encourages clear communication, listening skills, respecting other people’s opinions, thinking and problem-solving quickly, and working towards a common goal.
 
Poster of GreatnessDivide the pupils into groups of three or four (no more). Provide an A3 sheet of paper or card and colored pens and pencils. Let the groups create a poster that shows all of the positive attributes of the team – it can include pictures, words, etc., anything that they can think of that is creative and agreed upon later. After the activity, the posters can be hung on the classroom wall or around the school. This activity promotes communication skills, listening skills, respect, and working towards common goals.
 
You can connect with Elizabeth Wright on TwitterFacebook, Pinterest and Youtube.
 
David Gregory is an outdoor ed teacher with 15 years experience in leadership training and team building for school kids. There are so many fantastic team building activities for kids, which can vary from simple trust activities with little to no equipment, right up to obstacle courses or races that require significant preparation. Children’s Team-Building Activities suggested by him are listed below.
 
Entangled HandsGet the kids to stand in a circle shoulder to shoulder and put all their hands into the circle and take someone else’s hands. They can’t both be the same person’s hand! After that, they have to work as a team to unravel the knot of hands without letting go until they’re all standing in one big circle hand in hand. It is a fun activity that kids can get into and do with no equipment needed. The key to the success of the team in this game is effective communication. There’s lots of interaction required to achieve the untangled circle, as it will involve coordinating with each other, stepping up over arms and twisting around every which way! A great variant to add in is for them to do it without talking!
 
Shared SightYou’re going to need a blindfold, two ropes and a couple of random obstacles for this one! Lay out the lines so they snake around the room, to make up a course that must be traveled, then randomly place some obstacles such as soft toys or drink cans along the way!The idea is that one kid is blindfolded and the other, using only their voice has to guide them safely through the course without touching any of the obstacles or the rope along the way. This game not only requires communication but a tremendous amount of trust as well, therefore helping to meld participants into a cohesive team.
 
Raft BuildingThis activity requires a few pieces of equipment, including poly pipe capped at each end, empty seal-able barrels and some lengths of rope. The wider the selection of items the better, because it allows for greater variation in design and greater creativity from the kids. You will also need to be close to a creek/river/pool for this challenge, and there’s an excellent chance that everyone’s going to get wet!!! In small groups of 4-6 kids, set clear parameters as to how many pieces of equipment they can use. From the collection of materials, they then select and use these limited resources to build a seaworthy raft, that will not only float, but safety carry all members of the team across the river and back. It’s amazing to see the many variations of a raft, some far more practical than others. In this activity the kids must work together to design, build, then paddle the raft as a team. It’s a great way to engage all members of the team and while some may be stronger in design or building; others may be more muscular in paddling and steering. The real test comes when the kids have to carry the raft down to the river banks, and it hits the water for the first time!! Does it float? Yes!!! Does it float with everyone on it?… Well umm… There is a vast range of skills developed in this activity and it’s such a fun one to do.It builds confidence, communication, leadership, teamwork, trust, cooperation, and coordination! Even if the Raft completely falls apart on the water, it’s the process the kids have used in creating that craft that’s so important in the overall learning process. If all else fails, you’re still going to have a great laugh seeing these makeshift vessels breakup and gave the kids scrambling to grab all the pieces before they float away!
 
You can connect with David Gregory on Twitter, Facebook, and his Webpage.

Thanking Our Experts Joined in Children’s Team-Building Activities Roundup.

 
There are various team building activities for kids, aimed at communication, problem solving, planning, trust building, team work and sportsmanship. We focused here on the best children’s team-building activities based on our expert’s opinions.”Children’s Team-Building Activities” is the first ever expert roundup attempted by MomoandMe. We were overwhelmed by the support that we received and to keep the originality of the content, alterations were done at a minimum on the advises received. Personally thanking our experts Patti, Randy, James, Elizabeth and David. You guys Rock !
 
How do you rate our selection of children’s team-building activities? Please kindly contribute by posting your answer in the comments below and sharing this roundup to your epic followers!

Summary
Children's Team-Building Activities
Article Name
Children's Team-Building Activities
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Experts discuss their favorite Children's Team-Building Activities which boost their Communication, Imagination and, more importantly Self-Esteem.
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MomoandMe
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